Transitions may affect children and young people s behaviour and development

All children experience changes in their life at certain points, but it depends on their personality, the nature of transition and the support they receive from family and school, how they react to these turning points. A child who receives consistent caring support from the adults surrounding them will have enough mental strength to cope with these changes. Similar transitions happen again when the child starts primary school and later when transferring into secondary education. At these turning points all the people around them, including teachers and pupils are experiencing the same change, which helps the child to accept the new situation.

Transitions may affect children and young people s behaviour and development

Terms used in this guideline Recommendations People have the right to be involved in discussions and make informed decisions about their care, as described in your care. Ensuring equal access to consistent care 1. Improving the stability of placements 1.

Breadcrumb

Preparing the child or young person before they enter the care system or change placement 1. Improving the likelihood of a more permanent placement, including adoption 1.

Preserving the personal history of children and young people 1. Safeguarding and monitoring during interventions 1. For the use of pharmacological interventions for coexisting mental health problems, see for example, antisocial behaviour and conduct disorders in children and young peopleattention deficit hyperactivity disorderdepression in children and young people and alcohol-use disorders.

Children and young people with attachment difficulties, and their parents or carers, should be involved in the design of the training courses, wherever possible.

Transitions may affect children and young people s behaviour and development

If a change is unavoidable, it should be planned in advance so that disruption is minimal. See the table in appendix 1 for further information about these tools. It also covers children and young people who have been maltreated or are at high risk of being maltreated see recommendations 1.

Preschool-age children with, or at risk of, attachment difficulties 1.

Looked-after children and young people | Guidance and guidelines | NICE

Preschool-age children who have been or are at risk of being maltreated 1. Primary and secondary school-age children and young people with, or at risk of, attachment difficulties 1. Primary and secondary school-age children and young people who have been, or are at risk of being, maltreated 1.

Primary school-age children 1.

Guidance on the special educational needs and disability (SEND) system for children and young people aged 0 to 25, from 1 September As carers or workers in Out of Home Care you will more than likely be caring for a child or young person who has experienced trauma. Understanding how trauma effects brain development is a fundamental part of effectively caring for children or young people in Out of Home Care. The Effects of Transitions on Child and Young Person Development Transitions that do not occur in everybody’s life but only experienced by some children or young people during their development can affect different aspects of their lives as well. In these cases it is advisable for the teaching staff to pay closer attention to the pupils.

Late primary and early secondary school-age children and young people 1. Take into account that these factors can complicate therapeutic interventions and relationships with foster carers, special guardians and adoptive parents.

Discuss making contact with their birth parents or original family sensitively. Take into account that these factors can complicate therapeutic interventions and relationships with professional carers. Terms used in this guideline Carer A foster carer, professional carer in residential care, special guardian or kinship carer.

Edge of care This covers children and young people who are considered by social care workers to be at high risk of going into care for example, because of maltreatment, parental mental health problems or parental substance misuse.

Foster care The placement of a child or young person with a foster carer, who may or may not be related to the child or young person.

In the care system This covers all children and young people looked after by a local authority, including those subject to care orders under section 31 of the Children Act and those provided with accommodation under section Kinship care includes children and young people living in an informal arrangement, looked after by the local authority and placed with kinship foster carers, or in an arrangement planned to lead to adoption by a relative or friend.

Looked after A child is looked after by a local authority if they have been provided with accommodation for a continuous period of more than 24 hours in the circumstances set out in sections 20 and 21 of the Children Actor placed in the care of a local authority by virtue of an order made under part 4 of the Act.

Maltreatment This is physical, sexual or emotional abuse or neglect. Personal adviser Someone who is responsible, as set out in Children Leaving Care England Regulationsfor making sure that children and young people receive care and support from appropriate services when they leave the care system.Needs of looked-after children and young people.

Transitions may affect children and young people s behaviour and development

A great majority of children who become looked after do so because of abuse, neglect or family dysfunction that causes acute stress among family members.

Entry into care is usually a traumatic experience and brings with it a significant sense of loss that can be insufficiently recognised in care planning.

Child and young person development Outcome 3: Understand the potential effects of transitions on children and young people Identify the transitions experienced by most children and young people Describe with examples how transitions may affect children and young people’s behaviour and development Under each heading, explain how each.

– Describe with examples how transitions may affect children and young people’s behaviour and development All transitions will affect the child in different ways; .

What to expect from a FCOTA course

Transitions of all kinds will almost certainly have some effect on children and young people and many are an inevitable part of a young person’s development - Describe with examples how transitions may affect children and young people’s behavior and development introduction.

Sometimes this effect could be a positive one, but often the effect can. Prosocial behaviour has its roots in infancy and early childhood. To fully capture its importance it is essential to understand how it develops across ages, the factors that contribute to individual differences, its moral and value bases, the clinical aspects of low and excessive prosocial behaviour, and its relevance for schooling.

Improving the stability of placements. Ensure that, whenever possible, children and young people enter the care system in a planned manner rather than in response to a crisis.. Ensure that carers are ready to accept the child or young person's need to be in a loving relationship and are able and, whenever possible, willing to think about providing longer‑term care or involvement.

Adolescence - Wikipedia